Papermaking in Detroit: The Invasive Paper Project by Megan Heeres

Invasive Paper Project by Meg Heeres

Participant at ‘The More We Get Together’,
Artist with gallery visitor at the hand-papermaking station, 2015

What’s currently topical in the handmade paper world? Projects and artists that explore alternative, local fibers for papermaking. These are paper projects that often connect with broader circles, from community organizations to environmental agencies.

Whether it’s recycled paper scrap, agri-fiber waste, banana trunks, or invasive seaweed, over here at Paperslurry we’ll be exploring a few of our favorite ventures. You may have seen Jane Kramer’s Foreshadowing series, and today let’s take a quick peek at The Invasive Paper Project, which also works with invasive plant fibers.

Megan Heeres is an artist and also the person behind The Invasive Paper Project, which is based in Detroit but also travels to other locations.

She offers papermaking workshops with invasive plants harvested from urban areas. The project is an extension of her own artwork with a community focus.

hand papermaking process, community art project

Cooking Amur Honeysuckle, 2014

hand papermaking from invasive plants

Three Vats of paper pulp from invasive plants in Detriot, 2014

handmade paper from plants

Three finished paper, 2014

Part of the project’s mission is to think creatively on how people can find different uses for invasives, beyond eradication. Some plant species that The Invasive Paper Project has explored are Amur Honeysuckle, Garlic Mustard, and Phragmites australis.

papermaking workshop Detroit

Making paper outside in the sun with SCA youth.
Pulling sheets from the honeysuckle vat, 2014

harvesting plant fibers for hand papermaking

Harvesting Garlic Mustard with Picnic Club Detroit,
2014

The Invasive Paper Project thus far has held workshops and events with Hannan House, Picnic Club Detroit, and the Student Conservation Association.

handmade paper, community art installation

The More We Get Together, Handmade paper with non-native plants, Detroitus totems, paper-making station. Dimensions vary upon installation, 2015

handmade paper, community art installation

The More We Get Together, Handmade paper with non-native plants, Detroitus totems, paper-making station. Dimensions vary upon installation, 2015

Another aspect to the project is installation artwork that collaborates with Detroit communities. The More We Get Together consists of detritus and handmade paper from non-native plants, both collected from parking lots and city parks. Participants make paper with Heeres in the gallery, and the resulting papers are added to the installation. Cool, right?

If you’re interested in learning more…

 

 

One thought on “Papermaking in Detroit: The Invasive Paper Project by Megan Heeres

  1. Interesting what is considered invasive in one place versus another. I love making paper from garlic mustard, in the spring when it’s tender. It’s also edible. I’m in the Southern Finger Lakes.

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